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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 6637
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le (58m19s)

Deconstructing “joint improvisation”

What is “joint” and what is “improvisational” about joint improvisation? The “joint” aspect can be contrastedwith solo improvisation, such as that of a jazz pianist. Even when jazz pianists improvise in the context of anensemble, the arrangement of these improvisationsis often serial, rather than simultaneous: each instrumentalist improvises in turn while other members of theensemble play relatively fixed parts. This is in contrast to forms of improvisation in which two or moreperformers improvise simultaneously, either as separate entities (as occurs in contemporary dance) or as acollective unit (as in 2personimprov acting or contact improvisation). To understand all of these cases, ...
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le (52m15s)

Acting together without planning ahead?

Experiments on joint action have given us insights into the mechanisms that allow people to coordinate theiractions with each other, be it making music, dancing, or cooking a dish together. One key finding is thatpeople engage in predictions about their interaction partner’s actions. For example, when someone is aboutto hand over a candle to us, we anticipate the start and the timing of her action. A further key finding is thatpeople systematically modulatetheir actions in ways that make it easier for their interaction partners to predict them. For example, if youdon’t know whether I am about to go left or ...
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le (22m20s)

There could be ten seconds where everyone is connected and you feel really joined by the same thread and it’s really magical

Joint actions require an ability to understand and predict the actions of others far enough into the future to have time to plan and execute matching motor programs. Here I will review experiments in which we have tracked information flow from one brain to another to show that the motor system seems to play a key role in these functions. I will embed this experimental data in a Hebbian learning model, which posits that predictions are the result of synaptic plasticity during self­observation. Jointly this talk will aim to trigger thoughts on how we can ...
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Conférences

le (24m53s)

Improvising in Sign Language and Gestures

The Sign Language Theatre Laboratory is a practicebasedartistic research group that began operating in2014 as part of the Grammar of the Body (GRAMBY) Interdisciplinary Research Project led by University ofHaifa linguist Wendy Sandler and funded by the European Research Council. Most of the nine Lab actorsare deaf and hardofhearing,and all of them use Israeli Sign Language (ISL) on a daily basis. We use ISLcombined with expressive gestures and physical theatre in order to develop a form of visual theatre that isaimed at both deaf and hearing spectators. Improvisation is our principal method of operation. We play withthe mimetic component of ...
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Conférences

le (1h43m43s)

Gilles Bataillon : La malédiction du Guegense. Anatomie de la révolution sandiniste

Intervention de Gilles Bataillon consacrée au livre de Moïses Hassan, La malédiction du Guegense. Anatomie de la révolution sandiniste.Gilles Bataillon, spécialiste des formes du politique en Amérique latine au XX° et au XXI° siècle, a préfacé cet ouvrage.Inscrit au patrimoine immatériel de l'humanité, le Güegüense est une pièce de théâtre satirique écrite, en espagnol et en nahuatl, au XVe siècle. Elle est aussi un mythe, LE mythe, même, dont les Nicaraguayens s'enorgueillissent. C'est enfin une mystification et, pour l’auteur de cet ouvrage, une "malédiction". Car, ...
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Conférences

le (45m6s)

From me and you to we: how our brain integrates our actions and emotions when we interact

It is now well known that areas in the brain that are active when we act or feel become active again when weobserve other people act and express their emotions – as if we would internally relivewhat the other personis doing and feeling. In our daily lives though we hardly behave as passive observers, but rather interact withothers. During my talk I will guide you through a series of experiments that try to investigate how our brainintegrates our perception of others within a more realistic dyadic interaction in which such perception istransformed into a behavioural response to the state of ...
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Conférences

le (48m17s)

Operationalizing Social Neuroscience through HumanHuman and HumanMachine Interactions

How are neural, behavioral and social scales coordinated in real time so as to make possible the emergenceof social cognition? Answering this question requires to study the dynamics of coordination in real humaninteractions. However, even at the simplest dyadic scale, methodological and theoretical challenges remain.Several theories have been proposedto infer the link between neurobiology and social psychology, but the dynamical components of humaninteraction are still poorly explored because of the difficulty to record simultaneously the brain activity fromseveral subjects. This is the goal of hyperscanning methodology. I will first present how the combination ofsituated social paradigms with hyperscanning allowed to ...
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Conférences

le (39m35s)

How much do jazz improvisers share understanding with each other and with their listeners?

To what extent do collaborating improvisers understand what they are doing in the same way as each other?And to what extent do their listeners understand the improvisation in the same way as the performers? Thistalk reviews evidence from two case studies (with Neta Spiro and Amandine Pras) of pianosaxophoneduos, one improvising three versions of a jazz standard (“It Could Happen to You”) and one carrying out anextended free jazz improvisation. In both studies, immediately afterwards the performers were separatelyinterviewed, from memory and prompted by audiorecordings, about their detailed characterizations of theperformances. Outside listeners (expert musicians in the same genres) were ...
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