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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 33134
Conférences

le (45m6s)

From me and you to we: how our brain integrates our actions and emotions when we interact

It is now well known that areas in the brain that are active when we act or feel become active again when weobserve other people act and express their emotions – as if we would internally relivewhat the other personis doing and feeling. In our daily lives though we hardly behave as passive observers, but rather interact withothers. During my talk I will guide you through a series of experiments that try to investigate how our brainintegrates our perception of others within a more realistic dyadic interaction in which such perception istransformed into a behavioural response to the state of ...
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Conférences

le (48m17s)

Operationalizing Social Neuroscience through HumanHuman and HumanMachine Interactions

How are neural, behavioral and social scales coordinated in real time so as to make possible the emergenceof social cognition? Answering this question requires to study the dynamics of coordination in real humaninteractions. However, even at the simplest dyadic scale, methodological and theoretical challenges remain.Several theories have been proposedto infer the link between neurobiology and social psychology, but the dynamical components of humaninteraction are still poorly explored because of the difficulty to record simultaneously the brain activity fromseveral subjects. This is the goal of hyperscanning methodology. I will first present how the combination ofsituated social paradigms with hyperscanning allowed to ...
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Conférences

le (39m35s)

How much do jazz improvisers share understanding with each other and with their listeners?

To what extent do collaborating improvisers understand what they are doing in the same way as each other?And to what extent do their listeners understand the improvisation in the same way as the performers? Thistalk reviews evidence from two case studies (with Neta Spiro and Amandine Pras) of pianosaxophoneduos, one improvising three versions of a jazz standard (“It Could Happen to You”) and one carrying out anextended free jazz improvisation. In both studies, immediately afterwards the performers were separatelyinterviewed, from memory and prompted by audiorecordings, about their detailed characterizations of theperformances. Outside listeners (expert musicians in the same genres) were ...
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Conférences

le (18m26s)

“Beneficial JI” - Short talk 2.1: Neta Spiro - Joint improvisation in music therapy: characterising interaction in individual sessions with children with autism spectrum disorders

Some types of music therapy, such as Nordoff Robbins, involve improvisation by the client and therapist andthe relationship between the participants’ music making is prioritised. Some children with a diagnosis ofautism who attend these kinds of music therapy sessions often have difficulties speaking and can bereferred for a range of reasons (including difficulties in communication). What does improvisation look like inthis context? Does it differ between sessions and if so how? Can charting what improvisation in the sessionslooks like help assess changes in the client and/or the relationship between the participants? Studies ofmusic therapy sessions often analyse short moments. This ...
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le (17m15s)

“Beneficial JI” - Short talk 2.2: Julien Laroche - Being together when time is improvised: interactive coordination in pedagogical improvisations

Improvising music toghether involves coping in realtimewith unprecedented patterns of behavior of another. The goal is to achieve and share a meaningful coperformance,and this is done by interacting.Therefore, processes underlying improvisation cannot be fully grasped by musical analysis only. Behavioralpatterns and collective dynamics that underlie joint improvisation encourage the scientific study of thecoperformanceitself. This is important to understand how improvisers can coordinate their behavior together in a meaningful fashion. However, improvising is first and foremost a practice that requires learning,experience and expertise. Objective measurements aren’t sufficient : integrating the phenomenologicalpoint of view of the improviser is also necessary. For this ...
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Conférences

le (12m59s)

“Beneficial JI” - Short talk 2.3: Rachel-Shlmoit Brezis - Testing the limits – and potential of joint improvisation: Motor skills, social skills and interpersonal synchronization in adults with autism spectrum disorders

Research on joint improvisation has shown that expert improvisers, as well as neurotypical individuals, canjointly create novel complex motion, synchronized to less than 180ms (Noy et al., 2011; Hart et al., 2014;Golland et al., 2015; FeiningerSchaalet al., in review). Presumably, this ability relies on these individuals’motor skills and social skills – yet little is known about the preconditions and correlates of successful jointimprovisation. Here, we employ the Mirror Game paradigm (Noy et al., 2011) with a population of adults withAutism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASD is defined by a deficit in social and communication skills and atendency for routinized behaviors yet ...
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Conférences

le (1h3m59s)

Carrying the Feeling

Carrying the Feeling explores autistic Lucy Blackman’s use of “carrying” as an expressive force in herwriting. Continuing to delve into what I have called autistic perception theforce of perception that doesn’tyet parse out the environment but attends to the emergent qualities of an environmentality in act inthispaper I explore how else we might think conceptssuch as volition, intentionality and agency. Of particular interest here is the concept of facilitation, and theimprovisatory nature of what I call a “facilitation of facilitation.” If carrying is a force that already composeswith language, perhaps there is a productive way to consider an environmentally propulsive ...
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