Canal-U

Mon compte

Résultats de recherche

Nombre de programmes trouvés : 6409
Conférences

le (32m47s)

Michel TROCHU, Professeur émérite à l’Université de Tours, "La notion d’investissement et les systèmes de règlement des différends investisseurs- Etats dans les accords de partenariats entre l’UE et les pays d’Asie- Pacifique "

...La notion d’investissement et les systèmes de règlement des différends investisseurs- Etats dans les accords de partenariats entre l’UE et les pays d’Asie- Pacifique Michel TROCHU, Professeur émérite à l’Université de Tours...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (20m56s)

Patrick Adamson (University of St Andrews), "Transnationalism and the Transcontinental Railroad: Exporting the Silent Epic Western”

The Covered Wagon (1923) has long been regarded as a landmark in the development of both the western genre and the historical film. Paramount’s epic, along with the cycle of large-form westerns which followed it, garnered unprecedented acclaim from filmmakers, film critics, and social commentators alike for being first ‘authentic’ visualization of the Frontier heritage by which many contemporary thinkers defined American identity. Existing scholarship attributes this resonance almost entirely to Hollywood studios’ successful ‘exploitation’ of contemporary nationalistic sentiment. However, as this paper contends, the motion picture’s historical West was ...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (24m19s)

Costanza Salvi (Bologna University), “John Ford’s Cavalry Trilogy: American Imperialism or Irish Republicanism?”

Loosely based on James Warner Bellah’s stories published on Saturday Evening Post, Fort Apache (1948), She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), and Rio Grande (1950) are pervaded with a jingoism totally associated with military life and community as well as the idea of expansion and taming of the frontier. But if we look at the opera isolating the numerous references to Irish history and traditions, its problematical nature appears. The adherence to stage-Irish conventions and ethnic humor, although read differently by many scholars defending its ambiguity and deconstructive power, might be considered ...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (25m8s)

Céline Murillo (Université Sorbonne Paris Cité), “The Mimic Indians in Westerns : a Transnational Concept”

When Nobody, the native American character in Dead Man (Jim Jarmusch, 1995), recounts his travels as “an exhibit” in Europe, he explains that, to avoid attracting the attention he started to imitate the people around him.  He declares: “I mimicked them”. Homi Bhabha post-colonial concept of “mimic men” (The Location of Culture, 1994, p.125) is linked to language politics in 19th century India, where an elite was educated in English only, as demanded by Thomas Babington Macaulay in his "Minute on Indian Education" (1835). Mimic men are essentially transnational as their identity straddles the gap between ...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (24m32s)

Jenny Barrett (Edge Hill University), “(Not) John Wayne & (Not) the American West in Jauja (2014): Lisandro Alonso’s Slow Western"

Until Jauja (2014), Argentine director Lisandro had filmed only contemporary stories of isolated men in a long-take, observational style with non-professional actors, said to centre on ‘men who ride lonesome’ (Quandt, 2008). Jauja, set in 1880s Argentina, follows the story of Danish Captain Dinesen, a man who ‘rides lonesome’ when his daughter elopes into the wilderness. It features the star Viggo Mortensen, half-Danish and partly raised in Argentina, who contributed to the film’s narrative and music, and is filmed by Finnish cinematographer, Timo Salminen. Mortensen’s and Salminen’s input led to narrative and ...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (1h22m50s)

Table ronde "Contemporary Western FIlm Studies"

Roundtable on Contemporary Western Film StudiesChair: Hervé Mayer, Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3With, from left to right, Matthew Carter (Manchester Metropolitan University), Andrew Patrick Nelson (Montana State University), Marek Paryz (University of Warsaw), Jesús Ángel González (Universidad de Cantabria) and Fareed Ben-Youssef (New York University Shanghai)  Areas of inquiry include: (1) The Western as transnational genre:What does the concept of transnationalism bring to the study of the Western genre? Which areas of Western Film Studies have been approached through this concept and can it be applied to new avenues of research?What is the specificity of American Westerns compared with ...
Voir la vidéo
Conférences

le (28m47s)

Samira Nadkarni (Independent Scholar), "Chhattisgarh as India’s Frontier: Reading Masurkar’s Newton (2017) as Postcolonial Western"

Amit V. Masurkar’s 2017 film, Newton is simultaneously a satire and reconfirmation of the myths of democratic nationhood, exploring a postcolonial narrative of internal colonisation in the creation of national hegemony and law-making. The plot follows a young government clerk, Newton Kumar (Rajkummar Rao), whose attempts to honestly run a voting booth in the jungles of Chhattisgarh is hindered by the Indian army’s morally-ambiguous protocols, the constant threat of attack by Naxals (the soldiers of India’s Maoist-revolution), as well as his own rigid preconceptions of the democratic process and its best ...
Voir la vidéo

 
FMSH
 
Facebook Twitter
Mon Compte