Canal-U

Mon compte

Résultats de recherche

Nombre de programmes trouvés : 307
Label UNT Vidéocours

le (4m46s)

5.2. The tree, an abstract object

When we speak of trees, of species,of phylogenetic trees, of course, it's a metaphoric view of a real tree. Our trees are abstract objects. Here is a tree and the different components of this tree. Here is what we call an edge or a branch. We have nodes, a particular nodeis the root and other nodes are the leaves here terminal nodesand we see that when we draw a tree as an abstract object, we put the root upside and the leaves downside so it's the reverse of a classical natural tree. We need an expression to describe a tree and we will use this kind of expression, how ...
Voir la vidéo
Label UNT Vidéocours

le (4m50s)

5.3. Building an array of distances

So using the sequences of homologous gene between several species, our aim is to reconstruct phylogenetic tree of the corresponding species. For this, we have to comparesequences and compute distances between these sequences and we have seen last week how we were able to measure the similarity between sequences and we can use this similarity as a measureof distance between sequences. So we will compare pairs of sequences, measure the similarity and store the value of distance, of similarity into what we could call a matrix or an array. Before going further, let's makemore explicit the use of these two terms, they are not equivalentbut some people mix them. The ...
Voir la vidéo
Label UNT Vidéocours

le (4m53s)

1.2. At the heart of the cell: the DNA macromolecule

During the last session, we saw how at the heart of the cell there's DNA in the nucleus, sometimes of cells, or directly in the cytoplasm of the bacteria. The DNA is what we call a macromolecule, that is a very long molecule. It's Avery, in 1944, who discovered that the DNA was the support of genetic information. But the scientists who are most well-known for DNA are Francis Crick and James Watson who discovered together, with Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, in 1953, the structure of DNA, the famous double helix, the two strands. Here are Crick and Watson explaining on a very crude wire model far away ...
Voir la vidéo
Label UNT Vidéocours

le (4m53s)

4.9. Éviter la récursivité : une version itérative

La fonction récursive que nous avons obtenue est d'un code assez compact et plutôt élégant, mais effectivement peu efficace. Pourquoi ? Rappelons son fonctionnement. Cette fonction est d'abord appelée pour calculer le coût de ce nœud-là. Nécessitant le coût optimal de ce nœud, celui-ci et celui-là, elle est ré appliquée, elle se ré appelle sur ces 3 nœuds-là. Si on prend l'appel de la fonction sur ce nœud-là, elle va se ré appeler de nouveau pour calculer le coût de ce nœud, de celui-ci et de celui-là. Conséquence : vous voyez que ce nœud-là a déjà été calculé 2 fois ...
Voir la vidéo

 
FMSH
 
Facebook Twitter
Mon Compte