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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 14704
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le (49m11s)

Colloque "Elle fête ses 70 ans" - 3 Karine Grandpierre, L’internationalisation du magazine ELLE dans les 1980’s

Karine Grandpierre, L’internationalisation du magazine ELLE dans les 1980’s46 éditions actuellement; 80 pays; 21 millions de lecteurs; 6,6 millions d’exemplaires par mois; 42 sites;20 licences internationales; 60 appli mobiles et 86 appli tablettesL’internationalisation de ELLE est précoce: en1946 un numéro belge mais c’est un échec car seule la couleur en couverture était différente par rapport à a couverture française.En 1970: parution de An-An ELLE Japon qui joue rôle important dans l’émancipation de la femme japonaise 195491983 : publication du 1er numéro de ELLE aux Etats-UnisL’enjeu de l’internationalisation de ELLE: diffuser le « parfum français » dans le monde, la cultureellearoundtheworld.com ...
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le (16m50s)

Colloque "Elle fête ses 70 ans" - 7 Nuria Aragonès, “Le magazine ELLE Espagne et son rôle fondamental dans la propulsion de la mode espagnole dans le contexte des années 1980”

Nuria Aragonès, “Le magazine ELLE Espagne et son rôle fondamental dans la propulsion de la mode espagnole dans le contexte des années 1980” ELLE Espagne paraît au moment de l’éclosion de la mode espagnole, le n°1 paraît en oct 1986Elle Espana met en avant de créateurs espagnols: « Audacia espanola »3ème internationale étrangère de ELLE france
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Conférences

le (1h2m40s)

Brain to Brain approaches to joint actions

Joint actions require an ability to understand and predict the actions of others far enough into the future to have time to plan and execute matching motor programs. Here I will review experiments in which we have tracked information flow from one brain to another to show that the motor system seems to play a key role in these functions. I will embed this experimental data in a Hebbian learning model, which posits that predictions are the result of synaptic plasticity during self­observation. Jointly this talk will aim to trigger thoughts on how we can ...
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Conférences

le (15m29s)

“Quantifying JI” Short talk 1.1: Saul Albert - Extemporary movement: an interactional account of partner dance improvisation

Clear empirical distinctions can be drawn between joint improvisation and choreography in dance by exploring the rhythmical coordination of dancers and audience members in a partner dance performance. Novice dancers typically learn footwork patterns or ’basics’ that help them move in time to music together. Experts’ familiarity with basics, as well as conventional variations and set­piece moves form a set of compositional structures that can be linked together to fit complimentary rhythmical patterns in music on the fly. In a ’social dance’ performance such as the Lindy hop, (an African American vernacular jazz dance from ...
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le (15m44s)

“Quantifying JI” Short talk 1.2: Tommi Himberg - Mirroring improvised hand movements in a dyad

We studied coordination and movement kinematics in a mirror game. 32 participants (18 f, 14 m; mean age 25.2 years, range 19–37) performed circle­drawing and freely improvised hand movement mirroring tasks in dyads. The participants were standing face­to­face, right index fingers pointed at each other, fingertips 10–15 cm apart. In turn, one of the participants was appointed the leader, or the dyad was instructed to share leadership. Hand movements were recorded using an optical motion capture system. Joint leadership resulted in smoother performances than the leader–follower condition; the follower participant would often hesitate or ...
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Conférences

le (14m37s)

“Quantifying JI” Short talk 1.3: Ashley Walton - Musical Improvisation: Spatiotemporal patterns of coordination

When jazz musicians perform an improvisational piece of music their behaviors are not fully prescribed in advance. Nonetheless their actions become so tightly coordinated and their decisions so seamlessly intertwined that the musicians behave as a single synergistic unit rather than a collection of individuals. A fundamental aspect of such musical improvisation is the bodily movement coordination that occurs among the performing musicians, with the embodied interaction of musicians both supporting and constraining musical creativity. Here we consider the ability of pairs of piano players to improvise, to spontaneously coordinate their actions with co­performers. ...
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Conférences

le (40m23s)

Joint Improvisation in Music and Dance: Some Preliminary Phenomenological Considerations on Improvisation as an Enactive Process

"I have been a practitioner of soloandjointimprovisationin music and dance for a while. And I have alwayswondered what the main differences were between the two. What I am particularly interested in are the typeof experiences that allow me to cognitively function in a different way, that is, that allow me to explore new(cognitive) territories. In particular, there is always a moment, in an improvisation, be it solo or joint, when Iam in the « zone », that is, in a type of trance where my conscious mind is not in control anymore, or at leastseems not to be in control ...
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Conférences

le (1h6m12s)

Going into the unknown in science and art

Scientists must grope into the undefined place beyond the known. So must improvisation theater actorswalking onto the stage with no idea what will happen next. Improvisation theater developed practices thathelp groups of actors create a new scene on the spot, by focusing on mutual support: saying yes to eachothers ideas and bypassing the inner critic that spoils our spontaneity. I’ll describe how as a scientist by dayand improvisation actor by night, I learned from theater how to do better science. The concepts are universaland can apply to unexpected situations across disciplines.
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Conférences

le (45m6s)

From me and you to we: how our brain integrates our actions and emotions when we interact

It is now well known that areas in the brain that are active when we act or feel become active again when weobserve other people act and express their emotions – as if we would internally relivewhat the other personis doing and feeling. In our daily lives though we hardly behave as passive observers, but rather interact withothers. During my talk I will guide you through a series of experiments that try to investigate how our brainintegrates our perception of others within a more realistic dyadic interaction in which such perception istransformed into a behavioural response to the state of ...
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