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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 1125
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le (1h3m8s)

How prosody helps infants and children to break into communication

The talk will present four sets of studies with young infants and children to show who prosody helps them learn about different aspects of language, from learning basic word order through understanding focus to decoding emotional valence. The sets of studies are losely connected, but common to them is how prosody, an overaching feature of language, already encountered prenatally in the womb and manifesting in newborns' communicative cries, helps infants break into language and guides them through different developmental steps from grammar to communication.
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le (1h6m10s)

How Do Pre- and Post-Encoding Processes Affect Episodic Memory?

What post-encoding processes cause forgetting? For decades there had been controversy as to whether forgetting is caused by decay over time or by interference from irrelevant information, and a coherent account for forgetting was lacking. My colleagues and I have proposed the Representation Theory of Forgetting, according to which forgetting can occur either due to decay or due to interference, depending on the nature of the memory-representation and the brain-structure supporting it. The hippocampus—a structure playing a crucial role in recollection—has a unique neurobiological ...
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le (59m33s)

Modelling Memory with Types: semantics and neural representation

I will argue that record types in TTR (a type theory with records) can be used to model mental states such as memory or belief. For example, a type modelling a belief or memory state is a type of the way the world would be if our beliefs or memories were true. A sentence like: Sam thinks that Kim left is true just in case the type which is the content of "Kim left" matches the type modelling Sam's belief/memory state.I will discuss some of the ...
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le (1h3m41s)

The neuropragmatics of dialogue and discourse

In real life communication, language is usually used for more than the exchange of propositional content. Speakers and listeners want to get things done by their exchange of linguistic utterances. For this to be achieved, brain networks beyond those for recognizing and speaking words and establishing syntactic and thematic relations between them (who did what to whom) need to be recruited. The same holds for the alignment of speakers and listeners in conversational settings. In my presentation I will discuss some of our fMRI studies ...
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le (1h2m46s)

Dialogue Context in Memory

Recent years have seen the emergence of theories that can be used to analyze a variety of phenomena characteristic of conversational interaction, including non-sentential utterances, manual gestures, collaborative utterances and laughter. In all these cases the content of the utterance gets much of its content from the context (eliminating the antecedent leaves the utterance highly vague). Much of the rapid progress attained by theories of semantics and pragmatics in recent decades has involved a dynamic strategy where meaning emerges from gradual accumulation of information ...
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