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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 1286
Séminaires

le (1h57m40s)

Embodying Speech - Lecture 2 - The Parts of Speech II : Quantality and Speech Movements (Bryan Gick 2019)

While any theory of speech behavior must ultimately incorporate the human body, modeling bodies has not been a central program in language research. Thinking about the body in quite tangible terms was once a prominent part of modeling speech motor behavior. Joos’ (1948) model of coarticulation was driven by overlapping waves of innervation in muscle activation patterns, while Cooper et al’s. (1958 : 939), “action plans” described speech movements in terms of an inventory of muscle activations : “we may hope to describe speech events in terms of a rather limited number of muscle groups…” Turvey et al. (1978 : 566), however, shifted ...
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Conférences

le (1h10m48s)

The Legacy of Rudolph Kalman

In 1960 Rudolph Kalman published what is arguably the first paper to develop a systematic, principled approach to the use of data to improve the predictive capability of mathematical models. As our ability to gather data grows at an enormous rate, the importance of this work continues to grow too. The lecture will describe this paper, and developments that have stemmed from it, revolutionizing fields such space-craft navigation, weather prediction, oceanography and oil recovery; the lecture will also describe new application domains such as climate modeling, medical imaging and machine learning. Some mathematical details will be also provided, but limited to simple concepts such as optimization and iteration; the ...
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Séminaires

le (1h51m39s)

Embodying Speech - Lecture 3 - Coarticulation, Superposition, Representation (Bryan Gick 2019)

While any theory of speech behavior must ultimately incorporate the human body, modeling bodies has not been a central program in language research. Thinking about the body in quite tangible terms was once a prominent part of modeling speech motor behavior. Joos’ (1948) model of coarticulation was driven by overlapping waves of innervation in muscle activation patterns, while Cooper et al’s. (1958 : 939), “action plans” described speech movements in terms of an inventory of muscle activations : “we may hope to describe speech events in terms of a rather limited number of muscle groups…” Turvey et al. (1978 : 566), however, shifted ...
Voir la vidéo

 
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