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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 2297
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le (49m47s)

Le temps

Jean-Pierre Briand, physicien des particules élémentaires et François Jullien, philosophe, évoquent, l'un et l'autre leur conception de la notion de temps. Aristote, Platon, Saint-Augustin, Thomas d'Aquin, Avicenne, Ronsard, Lamartine, Baudelaire, mais aussi Newton et Einstein sont également convoqués dans le débat.La philosophie des sciences est morte du divorce, au siècle dernier, entre la Natürphilosophie allemande représentée par Schelling et Hegel et le monde scientifique. L'explosion des résultats en mathématique, en physique et en biologie a accentué ce divorce et les scientifiques se sont faits philosophes en expliquent le monde à leur manière. Cette série fait le point sur ces positions ...
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Conférences

le (24m59s)

The Start and the End of Our Interglacial

The previous interglacial (Marine isotope stage 5e, peaking at 125 kyr BP) is usually assumed to be a good analogue for our present-day climate. Moreover, as our present interglacial, the Holocene, is already almost 12 kyr long, paleoclimatologists were inclined to predict a quite close entrance into the next ice age. Simulations using the 2.5-D climate model of Louvain-la- Neuve show however that our interglacial will most probably last much longer than any previous one, even without human intervention (Berger and Loutre, 2002). It was suggested that this is related to the shape of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun ...
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Conférences

le (28m58s)

Modelling Forced and Internal Climate Variability During the Last Millennium

At hemispheric scale, the surface temperature is strongly influenced by the 28 variations of the natural (solar and volcanic) and anthropogenic (land-use, sulphate aerosols, greenhouse gas concentrations) forcings. By contrast, at regional scale, the internal variability, which is purely due to the internal dynamics of the climate system, can mask the forced response. As a consequence, before the 20th century, cold or warm periods are rarely global, homogenous phenomena. Furthermore, the response to the forcing could be associated with changes in the frequency of some modes of variability. This interplay between the response of the climate system to the various ...
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Conférences

le (24m29s)

Detection and Attribution of Climate Change to Different Causes

According to the last IPCC report, the most part of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations. This statement relies on a long process of demonstration that consisted in evaluating the ability of the successive generations of climate models to reproduce and interpret the climate variability of the last decades. The more and more numerous statistical analyses aiming at detecting and attributing climate change to natural and anthropogenic causes have reinforced the assessment of experts. The recent detection and attribution studies of observed ...
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Conférences

le (27m2s)

The Impacts of Climate Change on Continental Ecosystems

Climate change will deeply modify the ecophysiological functioningof plants, by creating a set of conditions which could be more favourable (in the sense of biomass production) or not. Among the first, the increase ofatmospheric CO2 will stimulate the photosynthesis (with levels depending upon plants and conditions), with a result of a potential increase in biomass up to 20 % in some cases. Warmer temperatures will also generally be favourable to most of the physiological processes, up to an optimum above which the risk of detrimental or lethal values exists. The (almost) generalized advance in phenology (calendar of development stages) will ...
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Conférences

le (33m37s)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Challenges of Climate policy, Equity and Ethics

The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report provides clear guidance for the greenhouse gas emissions reductions needed to limit global warming to specific targets such as 2 °C above pre-industrial values, as adopted formally by the European Union. Despite the strong scientific consensus found by the IPCC concerning the reality and seriousness of global warming, worldwide emissions of the greenhouse gases that cause climate change continue to increase each year. The nations of the world are still far from agreement on how to act to reduce emissions.
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Conférences

le (13m18s)

Climatic Hazard Mitigation Through Risk and Resilience Committees in Nepal

Nepal lies in an ecologically fragile and seismic region with a history of devastating Glacier Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF), landslides and earthquakes. Increases in temperature could increase the frequency and magnitude of climatic disaster occurrences. Winter snow in Kathmandu in 2007 after nearly 65 years absence, frequent flood events since 2000, and an increased number of glacier lakes in the upper Himalayas indicates that climate change may already be having a significant impact. Disaster events in Nepal are known to impact disproportionately on poor and marginalised people who live in more exposed environments during risky times and without adequate forms ...
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