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Nombre de programmes trouvés : 164
Label UNT Conférences

le (1h5m6s)

Opinion polarization and network segregation. Modelling a complex Relationship

Recently, many societies seem to shift towards more polarization and volatility in opinions, for example in attitudes about immigration, climate policy, or the best policy response to Covid-19. A key obstacle for a scientific understanding of this development is that opinion dynamics in society involve a complex micro-macro interaction between processes of social influence occurring at the micro-level, meso-level conditions like network structures, and macro-level outcomes, like consensus, opinion-clustering or polarization. I will discuss how agent-based simulation models (ABM) can be used to further ...
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le (1h5m6s)

Opinion polarization and network segregation. Modelling a complex Relationship

Recently, many societies seem to shift towards more polarization and volatility in opinions, for example in attitudes about immigration, climate policy, or the best policy response to Covid-19. A key obstacle for a scientific understanding of this development is that opinion dynamics in society involve a complex micro-macro interaction between processes of social influence occurring at the micro-level, meso-level conditions like network structures, and macro-level outcomes, like consensus, opinion-clustering or polarization. I will discuss how agent-based simulation models (ABM) can be used to further ...
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Label UNT Conférences

le (1h11m18s)

21 Molecular Algorithms Using Reprogrammable DNA Self-Assembly

The history of computing tells us that computers can be made of almost anything: silicon, gears and levers, neurons, flowing water, interacting particles or even light. Although lithographically patterned silicon surfaces have been by far the most successful of these, they give us a limited view of what computation is capable of. Algorithms typically control the flow of information by controlling the flow of electrons through digital-electronic devices, but in the field of molecular computing we imagine algorithms that control matter itself. This talk will be about DNA molecules that interact with each other in a ...
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le (1h8m54s)

Theoretical Foundations for Runtime Monitoring

Runtime monitoring/verification is a lightweight technique that complements other verification methods in a multi-pronged approach towards ensuring software correctness. The technique poses novel questions to software engineers: it is not easy to see which specifications are amenable to runtime monitoring, and it is not clear which monitors perform the required runtime analysis correctly. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework that can be used to provide answers to those questions. I will view monitorability as a spectrum: the fewer monitor guarantees are required, the more properties become monitorable. I will then present a monitorability hierarchy ...
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le (1h4m32s)

CoNeCo: Concurrency, Networks and Coinduction

In recent years, concurrent Kleene algebra (CKA), an extension of Kleene Algebra (KA) that includes concurrent composition as a first-class citizen, has been proposed by Hoare et al. as a setting to study the algebraic properties of concurrent composition as an operator on programs.  Orthogonally, based on KA, Foster et al proposed NetKAT, a domain-specific language that can be used to program and verify policies of Software Defined Networks. in this talk, we will show how to develop a concurrent extension of NetKAT based on CKA, which supports expressing and verifying the concurrent filtering of packets — on the same ...
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le (1h10m48s)

The Legacy of Rudolph Kalman

In 1960 Rudolph Kalman published what is arguably the first paper to develop a systematic, principled approach to the use of data to improve the predictive capability of mathematical models. As our ability to gather data grows at an enormous rate, the importance of this work continues to grow too. The lecture will describe this paper, and developments that have stemmed from it, revolutionizing fields such space-craft navigation, weather prediction, oceanography and oil recovery; the lecture will also describe new application domains such as climate modeling, medical imaging and machine learning. Some mathematical details will be also provided, but limited to simple concepts such as optimization and iteration; the ...
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le (1h7m1s)

Reasoning over large-scale biological systems with heterogeneous and incomplete data

Data produced by the domain of life sciences in the next decade are expected to be highly challenging. In addition to scalability issues which are shared with other applications domains, data produced in life sciences have very specific characteristics: multi-scale, incomplete, heterogeneous but somehow interdependent. This makes data-mining methods less efficient than expected to assist knowledge discovery. An example of such limitations is the study of biological systems in molecular and cellular biology, which cannot be uniquely identified with the data at hand. In this talk, we will introduce a strategy to study biological systems in the ...
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le (1h8m5s)

The quest for long-lived quantum bit

The field of quantum information processing (quantum computation and quantum communication) has grown considerably in recent decades. Numerous proof-of-principle experiments on small-scale quantum systems (few physical degrees of freedom) have been carried out in various physical frameworks such as NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), trapped ions, linear optics and superconducting circuits. In spite of all these achievements, and to make it a useful technology, an important step of scaling is required for multi-qubit (quantum-bit) protocols. The main obstacle here is the destruction of quantum coherence ...
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Conférences

le (1h43m57s)

Majority judgment: a new voting method

The traditional theory of social choice offers no acceptable solution to the problems of how to elect, to judge, or to rank. The classical model —transforming the “preference lists” of individuals into a “preference list” of society— is fundamentally flawed in both theory and practice. We propose a more realistic model where voters evaluate the candidates in a common language of ordinal grades. This small change leads to an entirely new theory and method: « majority judgment ». It is at once meaningful, resists strategic ...
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