Conférence
Chapitres
Notice
Lieu de réalisation
Maison des Sciences de l'Homme de Clermont-Ferrand
Langue :
Anglais
Crédits
Lowell Duckert (Intervention)
Crédit image : Maison des Sciences de l'Homme de Clermont-Ferrand
Détenteur des droits
Maison des Sciences de l'Homme de Clermont-Ferrand
Conditions d'utilisation
Droit commun de la propriété intellectuelle
DOI : 10.60527/m369-m990
Citer cette ressource :
Lowell Duckert. ClermontMsh. (2024, 20 mars). Cold Doings: Early Modern Actions for Our Warmer World. [Vidéo]. Canal-U. https://doi.org/10.60527/m369-m990. (Consultée le 23 juin 2024)

Cold Doings: Early Modern Actions for Our Warmer World

Réalisation : 20 mars 2024 - Mise en ligne : 4 avril 2024
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Descriptif

Lowell Duckert is Associate Professor of English, specialist of early modern drama and environmental criticism (University of Delaware). Invited by the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Clermont-Ferrand, he gave a lecture titled "Cold Doings: Early Modern Actions for Our Warmer World", in march 2024.

In summary

My presentation asks a simple question: what is cold? Natural philosophers, explorers, and artists of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries offered a variety of responses. Cold was a material substance comprised of “frigorifick atoms”; it was the elemental force behind freezing, or, “conglutination”; it pierced bodies and plugged up its pores; it was a shapeshifter that appeared as icebergs, snowflakes, and sheets; it lived in the “frozen zone” of the upper globe, but it also rode the north wind and spread out across glaciers; it took, prolonged, and gave life; and it was intensely pleasurable. Cold Doings: Early Modern Actions for Our Warmer World is an experimental book project that uncovers cold’s dynamism at different degrees of intensity, traces its assortment of agential forms, and visits its energetic, far-north places. To be clear, reading centuries-old texts will not save our vanishing ice and snow. But at a time in which popular climate studies obsess over “ends” (and “the end”) of a planet headed for meltdown, or a world “after” or “without” ice, I argue that the doings of early modern cold assist us in counter-apocalyptic thinking. Poems, plays, treatises, and travel accounts of the period crucially reframe how we view the cold of the past as well as the present, lending us a creative vocabulary to reimagine Arctic relations right now.
Lowell Duckert

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