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Nathalie MICHAUD (Réalisation), Université Toulouse-Jean Jaurès-campus Mirail (Production), SCPAM / Université Toulouse-Jean Jaurès-campus Mirail (Publication), Sarah Boscus (Intervention)
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Citer cette ressource :
Sarah Boscus. UT2J. (2021, 8 mars). From monoliths to megaliths: a new approach on the megalithic burials of southwestern France / Boscus Sarah , in 1st Conference for Women Archaeologists and Paleontologists. [Vidéo]. Canal-U. https://www.canal-u.tv/106875. (Consultée le 26 février 2024)

From monoliths to megaliths: a new approach on the megalithic burials of southwestern France / Boscus Sarah

Réalisation : 8 mars 2021 - Mise en ligne : 8 mars 2021
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Descriptif

From monoliths to megaliths: a new approach on the megalithic burials of southwestern France / Boscus Sarah, in colloque "1st Virtual Conference for Women Archaeologists and Paleontologists. Nouveaux apports à l’étude des populations et environnements passés" organisé par le laboratoire Travaux et Recherches Archéologiques sur les Cultures, les Espaces et les Sociétés (TRACES) de l’Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès et le laboratoire Paléontologie Évolution Paléoécosystèmes (PALEVOPRIM) de l'Université de Poitiers, sous la responsabilité scientifique de Julie Bachellerie, Ana Belén Galán López (Traces), Émilie Berlioz et Margot Louail (Palevoprim). Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès, 8-9 mars 2021. Session 2 : Occupation of territories and population mobility. [Conférence enregistrée en distanciel].

A major paradigm shift took place at theNeolithic period: Human transformed Nature and shaped the landscape that surrounds him. The megalithic architectures which are the first stone constructions of Humanity, illustrate well their will to mark the landscape. The megalithic burials also testify a new relationship to death, and probably to ancestors, through the perennial, aerial and therefore visible nature ofthese structures. Studies on funerary megalithism have been very popular with antiquarians, prehistorians and first archaeologists since the 19th century. As a result, many of these graves were formerly excavated and even looted, leaving sparsely information on the deposits and sepulchral rites. Many research axes have been developed since, but very few on the question ofthe links between these monuments and the natural environment. However, these architectures are the result of choices made by builders, choices conditioned by society and the natural environment in which they lived. In southwestern France, which has the largest number of megalithic funerary architectures in Europe, such an approach has never been proposed. However, the areas of concentration of these monuments are all located on the same geological entity, the limestone plateau, called “causse”. I will therefore present here the systemic approach developed as part of my doctoral thesis, allowing us to take an interest in this Human-Environment interface.

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